Blog | 200 words the Sun doesn’t want you to read

Yesterday the Sun asked the TUC General Secretary Brendan Barber to write 200 words setting out the case for the day of action, but they're nowhere to be seen in today's paper.

Ceasefire Bites, Ideas - Posted on Wednesday, November 30, 2011 12:24 - 1 Comment

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This is the statement the Sun received but did not print:

“This government cancelled the tax on bankers’ bonuses. Instead it has brought in a nurses’, teachers’ and lollipop ladies’ tax.

This is what the increase in pension contributions – around £1,000 a year for a nurse – really means. It is not paying for pensions but going straight to the Treasury to fill the hole left by the bonus tax.

It takes a lot to get Brits to strike. Yet the government has driven millions of its own staff to stop work, including unions that have never gone on strike before such as head-teachers. They are not stupid or manipulated by union leaders, but ordinary decent people doing important jobs taking a stand as a last resort.

We know the strike will cause difficulties today, and we regret that. But it’s proved to be the only language the government understands.

I’ve been leading talks with ministers for months. But they were going nowhere. It’s only when we called a day of action that government started to move. Ministers should listen carefully today to their staff, and get stuck into trying to reach the fair negotiated settlement that unions want.”

Spread the word.

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Ceasefire Bites

Ceasefire Bites is Ceasefire's news and opinion blog.

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A mass strike in Britain – is this a new era for organised labour? — National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts
Dec 3, 2011 5:23

[…] while it is easy to recognise, as the TUC’s Brendan Barber did in hisunpublished article for the Sun,the overtly political dimensions to the pensions’ dispute, it is quite another […]

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