“Revs” – A revolution in the way of classical music

At first glance, this is somewhat mad -exciting, but totally mad. For someone like me who hates clubbing because of its intimate settings, claustrophobia and loud booming music normally of genres I dislike, this merges a love and a hate. Will I like it? I don’t know. From the way critic Igor Toronyi-Lalic describes it […]

Paul Guest's Musical Notes - Posted on Sunday, July 10, 2011 18:32 - 0 Comments

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At first glance, this is somewhat mad -exciting, but totally mad. For someone like me who hates clubbing because of its intimate settings, claustrophobia and loud booming music normally of genres I dislike, this merges a love and a hate.

Will I like it? I don’t know.

From the way critic Igor Toronyi-Lalic describes it in London’s Evening Standard it will still have all the aspects of clubbing that I hate: “The place was rammed. Above my head, a light show set the ceiling ablaze. And, as ever, the music was too loud to hear yourself think” – Everything I loathe about clubbing.

“Yellow Lounge brings classical music bang up-to-date, leaving a trail of twin-sets, pearls and grey suits in its wake. Established seven years ago in the Berlin club scene, Yellow Lounge took the classical rulebook and tore it up before ingeniously stitching it back together. Kicking and screaming, flashing and dancing, Yellow Lounge fuses the greatest international performers with cutting-edge DJ and VJ sets in urban spaces. Experience the evolution of music”

But will this be a better kind of party? Probably- actually it’s likely. I don’t mind loud booming music, in fact I’ve been known to have attended various concerts of popular music, some of them shameful admissions (Madonna) and some brilliantly thought out and performed music in beautiful ambiences that you don’t find in classical music.

“Each played three serious short 20th-century classical pieces for around 20 minutes while the audience casually stood around drinking.”

Here Toronyi-Lalic refers to the guest artists who will perform on the night, as well as DJs remixing classical music, which all seems such a strange concept. I wonder whether I’ll be able to let go of the codes of the concert hall and opera house etiquette that I’m so used to.

Actually I do think letting go will be easy, I’ll be in a busy atmosphere with a drink in one hand. In fact, I’m sure I’ll forget the concert hall in a matter of minutes.

Will this work? I bloody hope so, talk about trying to liven things up a bit. Perhaps the ambience and atmosphere will change two things: The performers’ energy and the audience’s attitude. Because of the setting, of course, we seem to already be guaranteed a young audience.

Perhaps this is indeed the evolution of classical music. Anyhow I will be there to find out and I will report back. It looks like a strangely odd and intense evening of music and could be distressing. However I do trust Igor Toronyi-Lalic is his judgement on this, hence why I’ll be going, but we’ll see.

Perhaps you could find out too? Below are the details:

Organised by Decca Records: Wednesday 20th July with Doors 7.00pm; Live Acts: Danielle de Niese (Soprano) with the English Concert, Miloš Karadaglić (Guitar) and DJs & VJs: Resident Yellow Lounge Berlin DJs and VJs; Venue: Yellow Lounge, Yellow Arch, Bermondsey Street Tunnel, London Bridge, SE1 3JW

Paul Guest is Ceasefire‘s Opera critic. He also writes for Classical Music Magazine, Gramophone and is the resident interviewer at Opera Britannia.

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